"D o n' t   s a y   I   d i d n' t   w a r n   y o u."     

"They’re not characters who you’d normally see or partner up together. Being stuck with each other, this episode starts with Daryl in a dark place and he doesn’t want to go on and he’s growling at Beth the whole time. But it ends on a positive note. Beth showed him something about himself. He struggles a lot of the time and he’s got a chip on his shoulder; he doesn’t think people like him. But Beth helps him shed some of his old demons and feel good about himself and the need to let those things go and move forward. He definitely has a soft spot for her forever." - Norman Reedus

"People don’t like her because it’s the making of her, right now. When she, sometime soon in the future, becomes this person that she’s been kind of building up to, for the past three seasons, now four, then people will really begin to root for her. I think even the audience doesn’t realize she’s such a dark horse. If she acted badass and tried to kill everyone there, she would be dead by now! She’s so intelligent, and I can’t stress that enough. Courtesy is a lady’s armor. She’s using her courtesy to deceive people, and she’s using her former self as a facade, and it works so much to her advantage, because people still think she’s this naive, vulnerable, little girl, and she’s really not. She knows exactly what she’s doing. She knows what game she’s playing! And no one else does. And she’s learned from the best — Cersei, Margaery, Tyrion, Littlefinger, even Joffrey. She’s learned so much from these people, and they don’t even realize it. They’re unwittingly feeding her to become this great kind of manipulator. King’s Landing can either make or break a person, and in Sansa’s case, it’s making her.

Sophie Turner, in response to Sansa hate (x)

Saoirse Ronan photographed by Lisa Eisner

©DH